On Starting Slow and (Not) Obsessing

This post is sponsored by WeeSchool, the all in one parenting app from birth to age 3. All opinions and stories are mine, though. Because Roozle. Download the WeeSchool App here by June 1, and you can register for free, lifetime access to all premium WeeSchool content and features.

“How old is she?”
“Almost one!”
“Oh! Is she walking yet?”

It’s all anyone ever wanted to know. And that wouldn’t be an issue, except that she wasn’t. And no, I didn’t want to hear about your nephew and how he walked late “and turned out just fine!” because my kid? She wasn’t crawling either. In fact, she didn’t roll over when she was supposed to. She didn’t pull up to stand. She didn’t scoot or crawl or wiggle or any other way of moving from one point to another that you’ve all told me about in the aisle of the grocery store and walking to get coffee and waiting in line for ice cream. It felt like the whole city had told me all their stories of every little “late-blooming” kid who walked a month late. We were well beyond that and I had become obsessed. Maybe it was everyone else’s obsession with walking or crawling that got me started. Maybe it was watching all the other babies in her weekly playgroup zoom past her when she still needed help sitting up. Maybe it was just that I was a first time parent and didn’t want to screw up my kid. It was my only job. Just don’t mess her up. She’s a person.

And it felt like I was messing her up.

Except that, she was a super happy kid. She was perfectly content. Everything seemed to work okay, she was just falling behind on milestones. Everyone, and I mean everyone, told me not to worry. And I worried anyway.

Now, she’s much older. She cartwheels instead of walking most of the time. Yes, even in the grocery stores, she will sneak a few in. She decided to catch up at 15 months. After never crawling, scooting, standing, or cruising, she pulled herself up to stand for the first time on a Thursday night. At bedtime, of course. That was a fun one. I was like, “OMG YAY STANDING” and also “OMG CAN YOU GO TO SLEEP NOW.” The following Saturday morning, she ran across the room.

Maybe that’s just who my kid is. Maybe she just waits until she’s ready, then she goes all in. Maybe I did something right. Maybe all those hours of walking around holding my hands (and destroying my back) strengthened her legs enough to get her going. I won’t ever know.

“Might be something. Might be nothing,” was pretty much the diagnosis from Early Intervention. They worked with her twice a week at daycare. For the initial visit, I tried to remember everything… When did she first roll? Did she do it again after that? What about that time she scooted, does that count?

It was too much to remember. Because in the middle of all of it, I was also parenting. I had gone back to work when she was only 2 weeks old, leaving her with a friend a few days a week and working from home whenever I could. Then she went off to daycare and I left the office at lunch to go nurse her, because on top of all of this, she of course refused to take a bottle. Of course she did. Because Roozle.

If only I could go back in time, because WeeSchool puts is all together in one place. WeeSchool keeps a log of milestones for parents both to capture and celebrate those met and keep a record of any missed so parents can focus on the parenting. I was so busy worrying about what milestones my kid had missed and how to keep track of all of it for doctors and caregivers, I now realize I often didn’t celebrate and share the milestones she met. And this kid? She gives me a lot to celebrate. Like wanting to freeze dance while I play ukulele.

WeeSchool won’t let that happen. With 117 key milestones, WeeSchool provides research-based insights and play prompts for each so milestones are more than research and tracking, they’re part of supporting and celebrating your baby’s natural development. Check it all out here, with a free lifetime premium upgrade if you download and register before June 1. Though I don’t think Ukulele Freeze Dance is an official milestone just yet. BUT IT SHOULD BE.

And it’s not just about milestones, even though the early months of parenting can feel like it is. Parenting with the WeeSchool app helps parents figure out the hard stuff while they get to know their growing child. All in one place, parents can play songs, find the age appropriate expert recommended toys and books to buy, and even set a bath and bedtime routine.

The best part? It’s totally free. If you download before June 1st, you’ll become a free lifetime member with fully free access to all of WeeSchool. You had me at all all-in-one, but I’ll always go with free too.

Download the WeeSchool App here by June 1 and you can register for free, lifetime access to all Premium WeeSchool content and features.

Author: Casey

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3 Comments

  1. An old story my mom always told (because my brother was a late talker)…there was a little boy that never spoke…of course his mom was worried and tried everything to get him to speak. One day, while sitting in his high chair he looked up and said “this soup is hot!”. The mom screamed…”you’re talking…why haven’t you said anything before”…the boy looked up and said “because everything has been satisfactory until now”. 🙂
    They walk and talk when they are ready!

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    • Oh I love this! My mom tells me the story that when she took me to buy walking shoes I told her, “But I don’t want to walk!” and she said, “If you can say that, it’s time to walk.” HA! It’s so tricky to know whether it’s just the kid being who they are or some kind of underlying issue that needs attention. Finding that balance (and trying not to freak out!) is the hard part. At least in all of it, I’ve learned to never ask a parent, “Are they walking yet?” about any kind of milestone.

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      • I think you’ve found the balance! So true…you really have to watch what you say…in any situation. Love your posts…keep them coming 🙂

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